When the new Scott Sectors arrived, I was like a kid in front of the candy shop; 10 minutes before it opens. The trip from Aramex to home was plagued by worse than usual Qatar traffic and I may have ripped the box open on route. By the time I stepped out the lift at home, I had a new cap on my head. I pushed past a few pieces of clothing – I love the new ‘Pirate Permit’ technical hoody – and some headgear – my missus has already appropriated the beanie – to get to the two black tubes.

It was the longer, heavier than I’m used to, tube containing the 13 weight 3 piece (Sector 8413-3) rod that I gravitated towards. I’ve been fishing a Scott S4s #12 since around 2010. It’s beat and battered and has some good fish to its notches; it’s a rod that I love and I was keen to compare them.

The first thing I noticed about the was the extended handle. It’s like there’s an added shorter wells grip above the normal wells grip. Extended handles are nothing new on heavy rods and the lengthened grip will give added lifting and fighting power. There isn’t much give when you give the rod a shake and one can feel that this rod means business. For a moment I wondered about its castability – this worry proved unnecessary when I eventually strung the rod up.

The 8 weight (Sector 908-4), in hand, is quite simply delightful. It dances when give it a shake and has a balanced feel to it. The lightness of the rod is deceptive; the further into the taper you bent, the higher the resistance. It’s finished immaculately, light and surprisingly alive.

The components of both rods most certainly live up to hype. The Mil-Spec type III anodising, silky, looks good and, as all type III anodising is, bulletproof. High quality cork for the handles. I like the rubber fighting butt base – will take a bit more wear and tear. A noticeable difference is in the ‘look’ of the carbon web. While the Scott’s still have that unsanded – ‘natural’ as they call it – finish, there’s a different sheen to blank.

This thin layer over multi direction carbon fibre over Scott’s tried and tested ARC technology is meant to help overall performance through vibration reduction, increased strength and torque reduction.

The CeRecoil stripping guides – essentially a ceramic hoop in a recoil guide – are another defining feature with regards components. They bend, twist and pop right back into position. They’re quite something!

Slick finishes

Scott has a whole lot of tech info on their SITE if you want to read more.

Although I haven’t got to fish the #13 properly, I did confuse the hell out of the security guards by taking it for a cast on the beach out front of the apartment. I strung it up with a #12 Rio GT and then also with the Sci Anglers BWT 100lb Core. My initial circumspection was blown away with the first false cast. While the butt is broomstickesque, the increased taper still allows for a surprisingly easy casting action. I didn’t spend much time casting as the aforementioned security guards were getting increasingly antsy about the not fishing casting ballet show I was putting on, so photos and video are not available right now. (However, after promises of secret fly recipes and a trophy geet, I’ve lent the rod to Pete Coetzee for his upcoming Socotra trip, so more from him soon!) And then I want to test it on Omani yellowfin tuna come October. This is not an everyday rod, but it is a serious rod!

Smooth arcs through the back and front casts with the 8 weight.

The 8 weight, however, has not left my casting hand recently and it is the best flats rod that I have ever picked up. When I compare it to the Meridian, I understand exactly what Jim meant when he said “We put a turbo in the Meridian!” It’s improved on the Meridian in every way; from components to line speed, feel to accuracy. It has filled the big shoes of the Meridian exceedingly well!

I understand why Scott was compelled to “kill their darling”!

Watch future editions of The Mission Fly Mag for a full review on the models the coming issues.